Emailing Parents

This year, I have been sending out weekly emails to parents letting them know anything we did that was special, and what we will be doing the following week. Sometimes, I send out links or other resources too. This seems to have been greatly appreciated by parents, and has opened up communication in ways that we previously have not experienced.

More parents are emailing me to check in on their children, let me know they will be absent, etc. We also have a higher number of grandparents, aunts, or daycare providers dropping off and picking up children, so many parents are not there to hear/see what we did each day. Email has been a wonderful way to keep lines of communication open, and keep parents “in the loop.”

Email has also been a great way for me to touch base with parents when I have concerns that I want to talk about. People are so busy these days, that reaching them by phone can be difficult. To be honest, I am so busy, that calling parents during non-school hours can be difficult. While I know that email is much less personal than a phone call, it is sometimes the best way to reach out. There have been times when a parent and I use email to determine the best time for a phone call, or for them to come in to the classroom.

The downside

First and foremost, not everyone has email, or checks it regularly. Even with email reminders, newsletters, etc, information sometimes still gets missed. Attachments don’t always want to open, so we end up needing to give them a paper copy of our newsletter anyway.

Also, at least 2 times this year, one of my contact lists “broke.” I still don’t know quite what happened, but both times, it was in the class that has the most movement as far as kids coming and going. I think it has something to do with the removal of people from the list. Parents who have been relying on those emails to know what’s going on (or get their child excited for the week) get frustrated when they don’t receive them. Not only do they get frustrated, but they also miss out on information that may be important.

While email and technology can be really great for teacher or classroom communication, it is not perfect. This year, it has proven to be more effective than not, despite the “downsides” I mentioned above. Overall, I think parents feel better connected to the classroom, and I feel better connected to them.

My weekly emails are something I started doing this year, that I will definitely continue in years to come!

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